theenergyissue
theenergyissue:

Nature vs. The Internet: How Google Protects Its Undersea Cables from Shark Attacks
Footage from a recent survey of Google’s undersea fiber-optic cables revealed that shark bites are a very real threat to global telecommunications. Indeed, a Google spokesperson noted that the company actually coats its cables in a Kevlar-like material to protect against sharks. Interestingly, sharks seem to have more of a taste for fiber-optic cables than the old-fashioned coaxial copper wires. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme and International Cable Protection Committee Ltd. speculates that sharks may be "encouraged by electromagnetic fields from a suspended cable strumming in currents." In other words, sharks, which can sense electromagnetic fields, may mistake the cables for live prey. The phenomenon highlights the ways in which technology and nature can intersect, and the strange new interconnections between the energy of the natural world and our man-made grids. 

theenergyissue:

Nature vs. The Internet: How Google Protects Its Undersea Cables from Shark Attacks

Footage from a recent survey of Google’s undersea fiber-optic cables revealed that shark bites are a very real threat to global telecommunications. Indeed, a Google spokesperson noted that the company actually coats its cables in a Kevlar-like material to protect against sharks. Interestingly, sharks seem to have more of a taste for fiber-optic cables than the old-fashioned coaxial copper wires. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme and International Cable Protection Committee Ltd. speculates that sharks may be "encouraged by electromagnetic fields from a suspended cable strumming in currents." In other words, sharks, which can sense electromagnetic fields, may mistake the cables for live prey. The phenomenon highlights the ways in which technology and nature can intersect, and the strange new interconnections between the energy of the natural world and our man-made grids. 

sagansense

amnhnyc:

In honor of our new film Great White Shark, now playing daily in 3D and IMAX, here are some spectacular shark facts:

  • Sharks began evolving about 450 million years ago. Of the roughly 340 living species some have changed little in the past 100 million years.
  • Sharks were the first vertebrates to develop an immune system and may have a greater immunity to cancer than humans.
  • Shark teeth are made of hard enamel, which may explain why ancient shark teeth are the most commonly found vertebrate fossils today.
  • Some living shark species replace old and broken teeth as frequently as every ten days. There are 12,000 bull-shark fossil teeth on view in the Museum’s Hall of Vertebrate Origins—approximately the number of teeth a bull-shark will have during its lifetime. 
  • Shark bones are made of light, tough cartilage, which is rarely fossilized.
  • Like other cartilaginous fishes, sharks do not have a gas bladder to keep them afloat so many species (but not all) must move constantly to keep from sinking. Many sharks have large, oil-filled livers that make them more buoyant.
  • Most sharks bear live young. Some species can remain pregnant for over two yea­rs, longer than any other vertebrate.
  • Sharks typically bear three to 12 pups and many do not reproduce until age 30, making it hard for them to recover when large numbers are killed by humans.
adventuresinchemistry
A racist society will give you a racist science.

R. M. Young (1987). Racist society, racist science. In D. Gill & L. Levidow (Eds.) Anti-racist science teaching(pp. 16-42). London: Free Association Books. (via homoarigato)

remember when i posted about how science can be oppressive and i got hate mail and hundreds of notes of people calling me stupid

yeah that was fun 

(via booarenotboo)

Remember that time when they made up a disease for black ppl when we didnt wanna be stuck as slaves?

Remember when they operated on black women with no anesthesia to get modern gynecological surgical procedures?

Remember when they sterilized poor woc without consent to keep us from ‘creating more undesirables’?

Remember when the government allowed Black men to go untreated with Syphilis even after a cure was discovered?

Remember when minority heavy areas in cities were sprayed with radioactive material to ‘test’ how America could handle a nuclear fallout?

Oh, you dont? Because I do…

Go look it up. Every single one was done by a white supremacist nation called America.

FOR SCIENCE!

(via sourcedumal)

Don’t forget that in 1975 about 35% of Puerto Rican Women were sterilized without their consent by the US government 

(via thisisnotlatino)

en-thalpy

hyaenabee:

realmonstrosities:

Gars are massive, freshwater fish with long, toothy snouts and a protective covering of thick, bony scales.

The Alligator Gar is thought to reach a potential length of some 10 feet!

It’s a good thing people don’t randomly turn into enormous Gars and start chewing on any arms or legs that happen to be in the general vicinity!

…Images: Joachim S. Müller/Stan Shebs/Mat1583

Gar - really cool freshwater fish! The second photo and least the smaller fish in the third photo are spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus) which don’t get as large as the alligator gar (about a meter at most) but still have those toothy snoots! Plus, spots! You can tell by the spots on their bodies, fins, and heads. 

Anonymous asked:

I'm still in high school, but I plan on majoring in chemistry/physics and eventually a PhD in either Organic Chemistry or Astrophysics. Good luck with your studies! :) -(anon that asked about major)

That’s awesome!   We always need more people in STEM!  This will be the hardest thing you’ve ever done, but easily the most worthwhile thing as well!  Just study hard, and you’ll do great!  Let me know if you have any questions!  I absolutly love talking about science!